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Blazer Sizing

Size Chest Waist Arm Length
36 36" 29"-31" 30.5"-31.5"
38 38" 30"-32" 32"-33"
40 40" 32"-34" 33"-34"
42 42" 32"-34" 35"-36"
44 44" 34"-38 35"-36"
Size Chest Waist Arm Length
36 91 cm 74-79 cm 77-80 cm
38 96 cm 76-81 cm 81-84 cm
40 101 cm 81-86 cm 84-87 cm
42 106 cm 81-87 cm 88-91 cm
44 112 cm 86-96 cm 88-91 cm

Chest

Measure under your arms around the fullest part of your chest.

Arm Length

Bend your elbow around a 90 degree angle. Have someone hold measuring tape at the center back of your neck. Measure across your shoulder to your elbow and down to your wrist. The total length is your arm length.

Burgundy blazer with burgundy trim

3-roll-2 single breasted blazer $1,050

Burgundy blazer with burgundy trim

3-roll-2 single breasted blazer $1,050

Notes

Burgundy blazer with tonal grosgrain trim. Handmade in New York. 75% wool, 25% cotton flannel. 3-roll-2 silhouette. Three patch pockets. Burgundy grosgrain trim on edge of blazer and top edge of pockets.

Details

Handmade cloisonné buttonhole badge included. Cross-stitched Latin motto FORSAN ET HAEC under lapel. Rowing Blazers house button in brass, made in Connecticut. Unlined back. Self-lined fronts. Single button cuffs. Ventless. Props not included.

Size & Fit

This blazer has a modern cut and runs a little more snugly than most of our other blazers because of the hefty material.
36 runs short; 38-40 run regular; 42-44 run long. Model is 5'11" and wears a 40.

Provenance

"There is an oft-repeated myth that the blazer has its origins in the jackets worn by the crew of the H.M.S. Blazer in the mid-19th century.   But this is a classic case of false etymology.  In reality, the blazer was born in the early 1800s, in the rowing clubs of Oxford and Cambridge.  There, the blazer served a practical purpose, keeping oarsmen warm during chilly training sessions.  Many of these early boating jackets were brightly colored and bound with grosgrain ribbon.  It was one of these designs that introduced the word ‘blazer’ into the English vocabulary: the vivid scarlet coats of Lady Margaret Boat Club at St. John’s College, Cambridge, were nicknamed “blazers” on account of their “blazing red” hue.  I (re-) discovered the first known use of the word “blazer” in the Wren Library at Cambridge when I was writing my book.  I used the reciprocal privileges that came with my Oxford University ID and spent the day tracking down this reference.  Its context is a crew list in the 1852 Cambridge University Almanack, which now appears as one of the inner labels of our blazers.  The burgundy-on-burgundy is a refined variation on the very first ‘blazer.’" - Jack

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